High School
9th 10th 11th 12th
Math Algebra I: Patterns, relations, functions, equations, polynomials,radicals, quadratic equations, exponents, and inequalities. Geometry: Lines, planes, features of triangles, features of circles, polygons, surface area, volume, coordinate systems, and geometry transformations. Algebra II: Models for prediction, equations and inequalities, functions, linear systems, factoring, quadratics, linear programming, logarithms, conic sections, sequences and series, and an introduction to trigonometry. Pre-Calculus: Trigonometry, graphical analysis of functions, rational functions, analytical analysis, matrices and probability.

Statistics: Data collection, descriptive and inferential statistics, probability, and technological tools to analyze statistics.
Geometry: Lines, planes, features of triangles, features of circles, polygons, surface area, volume, coordinate systems, and geometry transformations. Honors Algebra II: Models for prediction, equations and inequalities, functions, linear systems, factoring, quadratics, linear programming, logarithms, conic sections, sequences and series, and an introduction to trigonometry. Pre-Calculus: Trigonometry, graphical analysis of functions, rational functions, analytical analysis, matrices and probability. Calculus: Calculus limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications, integrals and their applications, differential equations for modeling, definite integrals, improper integrals, advanced series, and polar functions.
Language Arts English I: Integrated studies of the classical works of the ancient world are studied within their historical setting. Studyof major literary masterpieces from the ancient world, particularly the foundational works of Greek and Roman literature. Students examine the birth, development, and interplay of literary ideas and themes. Introduction to the study of literary genres: epic, tragedy, and comedy. Students approach material through dialogue and persuasive techniques. Five-paragraph essay development and literary analysis.Art projects focus attention on the development of ancient theatre, literature, and culture. English II: Integrated studies of the classic works of these eras are studied in the context of the historical period. Studyof major literary masterpieces of the MiddleAges and Renaissance. Students continue to examine the development and interplay of literary ideas and themes and their impact on Western culture. Continued study of the literary genres: epic, tragedy, and comedy. Increased development of critical and poetic analysis along with researchskills for writing. Refinement of the five-paragraph essay. Refined Socratic discussions and debate. English III: Integrated study of the English Language and Composition. The classic works of the Modern Eraare studied in historical context. Study of major literary masterpieces of the Modern and Postmodern world. Students continue to examine the development and interplay of literary ideas and themes and their impact on Western culture.Understanding of the Christian theistic worldview and modern alternative worldviews from Deism and Naturalism to Existentialism and Postmondernism. Focus is on rhetorical argument from a Christian worldview in response to an adversarial secular perspective that grows throughout modernity and Postmodernism. Emphasis on the development of the novel and on poetry. English: Great works in literary genres -- epic, lyric, tragedy, and comedy. Analysis of these classifications as modes of knowledge proceeding from God's creative work. Includes development of literary analysis, vocabulary, and research skills in preparation for the AP Literature exam. This course marks the culmination the rhetorical development exemplified in college level writing and speaking skills.
Science Biology:Introduction to basic concepts of modern biology. Concepts include cellular biology, biochemistry, genetics, zoology, microbiology, and botany. All topics are addressed from a Biblical perspective. Laboratory experiences provide opportunities to view the concepts studied and to develop further critical thinking skills. Chemistry: Introduction to a physical science that relies heavily upon mathematical analysis and explores the nature and properties of matter and the interactions between matter and energy. Topics include chemical changes, balancing chemical equations, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, and states of matter. Labs are designed to supplement lecture and develop technical skills. Course designed to provide a comprehensive foundation in preparation for an introductory college chemistry course. Physics: Introduction to the study of nature in its simplest form.Topics include one and two dimensional motion, Newton's Laws, forces, vectors, gravity, momentum, work, energy, wave motion, sound, light, and electricity. Each major concept is examined either logically or experimentally. Physics requires an extensive use of mathematics. Chemistry: Investigates topics introduced in Pre-Chemistry as well as new topics. Can be considered second year of a two-year course study in chemistry and equivalent of general chemistry course taken during first year of college.

Anatomy and Physiology: In-depth study of the specific structures and functions of the tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Topics include a basic study of the body systems as well as an introduction to homeostasis, cells, tissues, and nutrition.
History & Humanities History: Integrated study of the history, philosophy, and literature of Western Civilization to A.D.500, taught at an honors level.The historical scope covers the ancient Near East, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome analysis.Art projects focus attention on the development of ancient theatre, literature, and culture. History II: Integrated study of the history, philosophy and literature of Western Civilization from A.D. 500-1600, taught at an honors level. The historical scope covers the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Early Modern Era. History III: Integrated study of the history, philosophy, and literature of Western Civilization from A.D. 1600 through the present time. Course covers the scope of European History. History: American History from Pre-Revolution to the present. Document-based analysis of events and perspectives in preparation for the AP U.S. History exam.
Fine Arts Freshman Introduction to Art: One-year survey course allows students to explore the elements of art by working two and three dimensionally with a variety of techniques and materials. Chorale: This course emphasized quality choral literature, advanced music literacy, proper vocal production, musical expression, and performance opportunities.

Rhetoric School Worship Ensemble: This class is an intermediate to advanced level class for vocalists & instrumentalists designed to teach principles of worship and to prepare students to lead contemporary worship in chapel.
Yearbook: Students produce ATLCA's school yearbook while developing skills in photography, layout, copy writing, and volume aesthetics. Studio Art: AP Studio Art is a one-year portfolio building class where the student assembles his or her portfolio containing three major components: Quality pieces, Concentration, and Breadth.

Senior Art: Senior Art is a one-year portfolio class on a smaller scale than the Studio Art class.
Foreign Language Spanish I: First year language study, early focus on developing novice speaking proficiency. Written emphasis on grammar concepts. Memorization of simple Bible verses in target language. Integration of history units that correspond to the era covered in ninth grade history. Cultural proficiency encouraged through the light of a Biblical worldview. Spanish II: Significant expansion of grammar and vocabulary.Activities encourage students to learn to speak elaborately about events in the past and future. History units on the specific countries again cover the same time period as the Sophomore History course. Honors level reading course offered for students who excelled in ninth grade. Optional Spanish III: Higher level grammar and reading. Continued development of oral proficiency fostered through in class activities and practice. Expanded analysis of original literature in the target languages. Extensive research of key works and Christian critique of worldviews held by the various authors.The final history unit reaches into the twentieth century, layering upon the events in history at the Junior level. Honors level reading course offered as well. Elective AP level language or Fourth year Conversation course: Substantial work on vocabulary, speaking, and writing to prepare for the AP exam. The conversation course focuses on refining oral expression, perfecting grammar, and cultivating eloquence in the target language.
Physical Education & Health Advanced fitness and skills building: Off-season strength and conditioning. Athletic offerings for girls include: volleyball, cross country, cheerleading, basketball, soccer, track and field, swimming, & golf. Athletic offerings for boys include: cross country, basketball, track and field, swimming, golf, &soccer. Studentsare encouraged to participate in team sports, where personal contributions are promoted in the light of team goals.
Government & Economics n/a Government: Founding philosophies for American political systems, structure of the U.S. government, the Constitution, and the Christian as a U.S. citizen.

Economics: Free market system, supply and demand, the economic way of thinking, tools for economic analysis.
Bible/Chapel Hermeneutics/Life of Christ: First semester, students are introduced to various genres of Scripture; principles of interpretation and application. Students study the foundation of the inspiration and inerrancy of God's word. SecondSemester is an introduction to Christ's life and ministry as presented in the gospels. Particular focus is givento the synoptic gospels, showing how all of the gospel accounts fit together and how each author had particular reasons for writing gospel. Memorization of key passages from textual study. Weekly chapel. Romans/Rhetoric I: First semester, students study the book of Romans in order to understand the fundamentals of the gospel and the content of the Christian faith. Secondsemester, students study the major world religions as they also begin their study of classical rhetoric, learning to develop an oral speech using the five canons of rhetoric. Memorization of key passages from textual study. Weekly chapel. Apologetics/Hebrews: Continued development of exegetical, apologetical and rhetorical skills that they have been building in the previous two years. Exegetically, the Juniors study the book of Hebrews, discovering the rich connection between the Old Testament promises and the fulfilled work of Jesus Christ. Second semester the Juniors begin preparing for their senior thesis by studying Apologetics. They discuss the major worldviews that have shaped Western civilization. Memorization of key passages from textual study. Weekly chapel. Senior Thesis/Rhetoric II: Biblical text driven class studying Job, Philippians, and Ecclesiastes giving the students a broad knowledge of God's working throughout history. Memorization of key passages from the textual study. The course is capped off with a written thesis that will be orally defended concerning an ethical/moral topic. Weekly chapel.